First Name
Email address


 

Should You Make Contact With The Judgment Debtor?

 
One of the aspects of judgment recovery that makes it so appealing is that you do not need to contact the judgment debtor to enforce the judgment.
 
Once you've located assets, in most states you simply instruct the levying officer to attach them. If all goes well, you'll soon receive payment(s) to satisfy your judgment.
 
Sometimes, though it does make sense to communicate with the debtor. Here's why. At my company one of our preferred judgment recovery enforcement tools are wage garnishments.
 
Once you've located your debtor's place of employment you simply have the levying officer serve the debtor's employer with a writ of attachment. (see wage garnishments for more information)
 
However, after the garnishment begins, the debtor may want to  satisfy the judgment. Obviously no one likes having their wages garnished. It's a huge  embarrassment. Plus it's additional work for the employer.
 
If the debtor wants to payoff the judgment or make a settlement, in order to have you release the garnishment it's a-okay to take his offer as long he adheres to the following stipulations:
 
 
He must first agree to the dollar amount you specify necessary to release the garnishment.
The funds must be in the form of a cashier's check only.
The funds must reach you by the date you specify.
The wage garnishment will not be released until the funds have been received in full.
 
 
You should send the debtor a contract with these stipulations included. Once you receive payment in full you should immediately release the garnishment and file a notice of satisfaction with the court.
  
All the best,

Mike O'Connor
 
 

(Try some more free online judgment recovery training... Take our free judgment recovery training course, or, when you're ready for serious judgment recovery instruction, try How To Make Real Money In The Judgment recovery Business.)

Click the arrows to page through the articles.

Article 13 of 15
 

The entire contents of this newsletter Copyright American Judgment Recovery Service. Please feel free to share this newsletter with your friends or post it on your site as long as it is left intact with all links unchanged and this notice.